Cars


Mini Rebuild

 

Step 75 - Engine Back In (for the final time???)

 

One of the few issues that were created by mounting the engine 1/2" lower in the subframe was a misalignment between the mounting locations for the top engine steady. The brace bolts to the side of the engine block on one side and a bracket welded to the firewall on the other. There is no ability to connect these two in stock form unless they lie on the same plane. After a bit of thinking and sketching I came up with the design below:

Mini Rebuild Step 75

The plate will bolt to the side of the engine block, exactly where the engine steady normally goes. The engine steady now slides onto the two threaded sections.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Because the plate must lie flat against the side of the block, the threaded sections are pinned in, locking them in place.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Not a great photo but you can see the mount and engine steady in place.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Here it has been bolted in at both ends. It works.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

I also welded on an AN bung onto the clutch case breather. This makes installing and removing the breather line infinitely easier.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

My earlier measurements of the clearance between the exhaust headers and firewall led me to install some heat shielding. The lower is DEI's Heat Screen with adhesive backing. The upper section is their Reflect-A-GOLD tape. There is a good chance I will be removing the latter and replacing it with Heat Screen but I want to try this first.

 

You will also notice in this photo that I removed the old brake line light switch, since I already found a better mounting location in the back seat. I've also cut the fuel lines to length and re-installed them.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Although I had earlier decided to mount the shifter box inside the cabin, I gave it some more thought and decided against it. Although some additonal room in the exhaust tunnel would be nice, it wasn't absolutely necessary. Besides, you know what a stickler I am for keeping things stock.

 

Speaking of that, I installed the stock shifter and found that with the seats so far back in my car, I was unable to reach the shifter in most gears. The throws are pretty long too. Even if I lengthened the stock shifter and bent it rearwards enough to reach, the thows would be even longer. My solution to the long reach to the shifter turned out to be even easier than I planned. Instead of modifying the stock lever, I simply ordered a new KAD (yes, KAD again! No, they don't sponsor me. I wish.) short shifter. And not the regular one but the longest one they make, which is actually for the Moke. Test fitting it revealed that it was more than sufficient, as-is. The longer length put the shift knob much closer but the shorter throws also assisted. And God bless KAD - the thing is a cinch to install. Finally something easy!

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

The shifter box does move around a bit with use. To prevent it from banging into the chassis, I enlarged the hole a bit more.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Here it is with the shift boot and retainer plate installed. I'm happy.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Here you can see the Radium Engineering breather catch can. The A-series needs a good breather system and I believe this will do the trick. Any air that blows past the rings would increase pressure within the block and gearbox and force its way past various seals, resulting in oil leaks among other issues. This is prevented by allowing the pressure to escape, in this case to the catch can. The insides are designed to trap any oil that is being carried along by the gas. The oil can be drained out the bottom occasionally and disposed of. The gas is allowed to escape thru the small air filter on its way out to the atmosphere.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

I'm happy with the fuel line routing. The grey line running across the front of the engine is the supply line, bringing fuel to the fuel rail.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

The fuel pressure is controlled by the regulator, which I attached directly to the opposite end of the rail. This seemed the cleanest solution - the pressure gauge is easy to see, the breather to atmosphere line points directly down, minimizing water/dirt ingress, an additional fuel line is avoided, the excess fuel exits the regulator and is already headed directly backwards where it needs to go. Best of all, the bonnet closes! Barely. I will have to keep an eye on this area as excessive rocking of the engine during driving could tap the pressure gauge into the underside of the bonnet.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Here you can see the fuel lines and dry-break fittings. One is run with the female side down and the other is opposite. That way I won't hook them up wrong.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 75

Just a shot of the front-end. I have already test-fit the starter motor with no issues. I will re-install it right before it is time to start the engine.

 

 

Continue to Rebuild Step 76

 

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