Cars


Mini Rebuild

 

Step 64 - Fuse/Relay Boxes

 

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

I originally designed the wiring system with two fuse/relay boxes inside the engine compartment. I would have preferred mounting them in the passenger compartment to keep them away from the heat and the elements that they would be exposed to within the engine bay. Plus the main ECU, sub-ECU's (Pro-Shift, PowerCommander, etc.) and any number of switches, gauges, and controls are inside the passenger compartment. Better to keep the wiring run as short and simple as possible. Two problems arose with this plan - one was that I would need to pass a large number of wires back and forth through the firewall to connect everything within the passenger compartment to the fuse/relay boxes. The second was that given the fuse/relay boxes I had already decided upon, I was quickly running out of circuits to have everything fit into just two boxes.

 

I finally decided to double the number of fuse/relay boxes and mount two in the passenger compartment and two within the engine bay. One of each would be constantly connected to power, the other would be switched power (meaning powered up only when the ignition key was in either the 'ACC' or 'On' position). In order to get power to the two boxes in the passenger compartment I mounted these two red pass-thru connectors on the firewall. I will soon hook up wires from the power relay modules two outputs.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

The power will flow through to the backside of the firewall and then land at either of the fuse/relay boxes.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

The next challenge was to find a suitable location for the interior fuse/relay boxes and a way to mount them. Underneath the lower dashboard might have been a good choice had I not already decided to mount the R1 ECU and sub-ECU's there. Instead the boxes would need to mount on the dashboard, facing the passenger. This would be similar to how the factory Mini Works rally cars did it, but instead of using sheetmetal I decided to go with carbon fiber.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

I thought trimming carbon fiber required special tools and techniques but apparently not. I watched this helpful video which recommended using any number of conventional hand and power tools. It sounded similar to working with fiberglass, just more expensive if you screw up.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

I used blue painters tape to both protect the nice finish on the carbon fiber sheet as well as give me a place to mark out the dimensions of the mounting holes and panel pass-thru holes.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

This is how the fuse/relay boxes look installed in the panel. Now it was time to find a suitable mounting method onto the dashboard.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

I decided to use these quick-release pip pins to make removal of the panel as quick and easy as possible.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

Finding the best location took a bit of time.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

Once I had the location I was able to work backwards and fabricate a mounting bracket. Here it is completed and painted.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

And here is how everything looks mounted in the car.

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

 

Mini Rebuild - Step 64

Soon I will be able to terminate a number of the wires you see here into the back of the fuse/relay panels. One day I might even be able to start this car. Just imagine that!

 

Continue to Rebuild Step 65

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