Cars


Mini Rebuild

 

Step 48 - Almost Driveable

 

Here's what I had to do to get the car ready for its first drive under R1 power:

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Out with the old cunifer brake lines and in with steel ones.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Since I would be driving the car shortly I tightened down the rear hub nuts to spec and fitted the dust caps.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

As I said earlier the nice hidden location I had before for the rear proportioning valve just wasn't working anymore. Here is its new home.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Out with the steel driveshafts and in with the titanium ones.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Same thing with the upper suspension arms.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

With the brakes, suspension, and drive shafts sorted, the engine could finally drop back into the engine bay. I'm getting pretty good at it.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

I knew the brake lines would have to be trimmed but I'd put it off until now. Doing the work in the engine bay was not exactly fun.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Unlike the Stabli quick-release connectors for the brake lines, these Jiffy-Tite fittings on the fuel lines leak fluid when disconnected. Not much but when you are expecting zero, any is a surprise.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

I haven't tried disconnecting the clutch line quick-release fitting but I'm hoping it is like the brake fittings.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Here are the brake lines run to the master cylinders. I filled and bled the clutch and I'm happy to report it works quite well.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

This shot was meant to show the routing of the brake lines but I think it better illustrates what a mess the car is at the moment.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

The advice I received was to leave the inner pot joints attached to the differential when installing/removing the engine from the car, but to remove the band clamp on it and remove the entire drive shaft with the outer section of the pot joint still attached. This was made even easier by just removing the front hubs from the car. A little bit of extra work up front but it saves a lot of trouble later.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Just before re-installing the engine I made a template for the throttle body spacing. This would help me cut the holes into the airbox accurately.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

I was shocked at how well this worked. The holes were easy to cut and the airbox fits the throttle bodies perfectly. Some test fitting of the airbox to the engine revealed there is some serious trimming required to get it to fit. I'll return to this later. I want to drive this thing!

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

And in order to do so all of these items will have to be re-installed.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

I dreaded re-installing the oil filter takeoff just because there is no room to get tools in to access it. I finally broke down and did what I should have done earlier - I sliced this 1&5/16" wrench in half. It fits now.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Mark at MINIeXvo already has a procedure outlined for setting the oil level within the power transfer box but my adding additional lines, pump, and cooler meant that wouldn't work. After some discussion I came up with priming the pump to fill the entire system, then draining off the excess from the top filler in the system.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

For the cost of the Silkolene gearbox oil, I didn't waste a drop. All the excess that drained out went right back into the bottle.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

Here you can see the fittings that connect to the radiator. AN fittings are good. I like AN fittings.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

A shot of the fuel supply and return lines, now cut to the proper length and with quick-release connectors fitted.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

And now time for the wiring harness.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 48

With everything back in place and the sun quickly setting I tried to fire the car up. It ran for a few minutes then died abruptly. I proceeded to waste several hours over the next three days before realizing that one of the R1's fail-safe mechanisms had been triggered, allowing the starter motor to turn over indefinitely while keeping the fuel injectors off. Removing the tip-over sensor and replacing it with a 470 Ohm resistor did the trick. The engine fired immediately, meaning it was finally time to drive!

 

Continue to Rebuild Step 49

Return to Mini