Cars


Mini Rebuild

 

Step 44 - The Engine Bay

 

I have been working 7 days a week on the Mini, trying to get it ready to start up by June 5th. For every item I complete, I seem to be adding 4 new things to my to-do list. All I can do is just keep going. Here's what I've done:

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

The way I had the roll cage tie into the front suspension means the normal early Mini twin subframe bolts won't work. Here you can see the plates I've made top and bottom. Sandwiched in-between is a heavy-duty spacer to prevent the bulkhead from being crushed. I haven't finished the upper plates cosmetically but they do work. I'm relying on one large central bolt with the two outer bolts being inserted upside down from the subframe going upwards.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

While the Mini was away the other week I took some time to clean up the garage and to organize all my parts. Everything that would not be used on the car was moved elsewhere. I have a hard enough finding what I need as it is.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

I removed the pedal cage to install the hydraulic clutch's master cylinder. I wasn't sure exactly which size to buy and I didn't want to think about it - hurts too much. So I ordered the largest diameter one Tilton makes. Notice the diameter compared to the other two? Worst case, I'll swap it out with another size later.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

I re-installed the front subframe and found room for both the fuel lines and the main battery cable in-between the subframe and firewall. I then routed the power cable straight up into the passenger area. This is where I'm going to mount all the electrical systems.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

This is where the cable comes out - exactly where I need it. More on all that soon.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

I did take a few minutes to lay out and mark the rest of the R1 wiring harness. I used copies of the Yamaha service manual wiring diagram, the Haynes manual's diagram, and this site. Once you spend a few hours with the harness, it all starts to make sense. I know the electrical system is going to give me fits but I'm sort of looking forward to it. Should be only a couple weeks away.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

With all the wires and connectors on the engine labeled, it was time to drop it back into the car.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Woops. Forgot something - the front brake lines. The left and right front brake lines need to connect together with the line coming from the master cylinder. I also wanted to install a brake pressure sensor here to activate the brake lights. This 4-way union will do the trick if I can find a place to mount it as well as an orientation that make good sense. I think I finally have the spot, but I won't know until I fit the engine back in.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Here it is tucked under the front crossmember....

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

...with the pressure sensor mounted on top and the mc line running through the firewall.

Mini Rebuild Step 44

And here's another thing I decided to handle before installing the engine. These are a couple of the coolant lines. Thanks to some more reading and talking things over with my friend, I've re-designed part of the cooling system. We were able to determine that the radiator will in fact be the highest point in the system, eliminating the need for a header tank. That means ditching the one I previously purchased and buying a new one.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Here is a diagram of my cooling system. Save it to your computer to view it full-sized. It helped tremendously to read another guide by the guys at Pirate 4x4 forums. I wish I found it earlier. It would have saved me a lot of trouble.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

If I'm going to be test driving the car around the block, I supposed I should have working brakes. Time to finally install the front brake pads.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Here I start to make lines for the transfer box' cooling system.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

First line fitted.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

After destroying the first remote oil filter take-off, I was a bit more careful with this second one. You can just see on the top where I ground away a tiny bit of material to clear protruding areas of the R1's engine block. I also had to machine down the R1's oil filter bolt head some.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Now it's really time to install the engine.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

A tight fit in back. Here you can also see the engine ground strap I installed.

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Don't ever paint parts before test-installing them. Total waste of time. The drive shafts I painted black a month ago look even worse now than they do in the photo. It won't be a problem though as you'll see at a later date.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

The rear engine steady mount is now installed.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

The photo is out of focus, but you can see that the engine did clear the location I picked out for the brake union 4-way. I finished installing the lines coming back from the left and right front wheels.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

I jacked the car up to gain access to this fitting on the underside of the transfer box. This line routes around to the righthand side of the engine bay and thru a thermostat switch and oil filter before connected onto the oil pump.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

After WAY too much work, the driveshafts are installed.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Time to fill and bleed the hydraulic clutch system. Result? It works great. Bad news is the clutch itself does not. The '02-'03 R1 clutch mechanism is notoriously easy to screw up on installation. I suspected I did it wrong but wasn't able to test it easily outside the car. Guess I'll be pulling the motor one more time before startup.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Here is the transfer box oil cooler sans lefthand mounting ears. This is one of the smallest oil coolers offered and in the Mini engine bay it is still too big. With some more trimming and a custom mount, it should work.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Speaking of custom mounts, here is what I came up with. I start with a bolt, washer, and a couple nuts. I then weld the nut to the washer, and then weld the washer to a short length of steel pipe.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

End result? A removeable column to support the oil cooler bracket.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

This is the oil cooler mount I quickly fabbed up.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

I'm not finished but it looks like it will work. I can finish it once I get the exhaust back from the ceramic coaters.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

Here is another line I made for the transfer box cooling system. This is looking down the righthand side of the engine bay at the Tilton oil pump. The blue canister is an in-line oil filter. The device below that is a temperature-activated switch, which will only turn the pump on when oil temperature exceeds 180F.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

My first attempts at fabricating a bracket for the clutch and brake fluid reservoirs did not go well. In fact, it turned out awful. I really need a few additional tools to do it right but these would be quite expensive and take up too much space. I also didn't feel like running to Techshop to make what I needed. I decided to try and work with something I had already in the garage. That is when I spotted the two Setrab oil cooler mounts. I purchased these with the cooler but I could not use them, despite my best efforts. Shame to waste them though. So with a few modifications they work quite well.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 44

This is how she looks at the moment. Of the 5 systems I have to finish ( the cooling system, remote oil filter system, transfer box cooling system, exhaust system, and electrical system) I have now completed.....none. However, I have made progress on every item. Check back soon for another update.

 

Continue to Rebuild Step 45

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