Cars


Mini Rebuild

 

Step 40 - Throttle, Fuel Lines, Power Shifter, Fuel Tank

 

I admit it - progress on the Mini definitely slowed since the MINIeXvo kit arrived. I'll discuss that more in the next installment but for now, here's what has been accomplished since my last update:

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

I'm using the stock Mini fuel tank in the boot so fuel lines would be necessary to run gas from the back to the front fuel injection rail, then any unused fuel would need to returned to the tank. As much as I didn't want my fuel lines exposed to the elements, I preferred them under the car than inside the passenger compartment. Safety trumps durability on this one. The lines I purchased would require a pretty mean hit to make them rupture but on the advice of a friend I decided to route them along the edge of the exhaust tunnel.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40
Mini Rebuild Step 40

Here where the fuel lines wound up in the boot.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

I've been told that braided stainless steel lines tend to scrape and destroy just about anything they come in contact with. To keep the lines away from anything including one another I purchased these Earl's hose seperators.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

And here are th lines being test-routed along the bottom of the car.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Here you can see where I routed the lines up through the hole in the front subframe.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

And here is where the lines enter the engine bay by snaking between the firewall and rear of the front subframe.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

I had these threaded fittings welded onto the Mini fuel pump by a professional, making it possible to solidly attach the fuel line connectors, one of which is pictured here.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Once the lines were all routed it was time to trim them to length and attach the end fittings.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Here are the lines temporarily fitted to the fuel pump.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

With the fuel pump out you can see the baffle I had welded into the tank to prevent fuel starvation. Simple but hopefully effective.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

I removed the tank, cleaned the inside and sealed it with POR15's fuel tank rust preventative coating. Now I just have to clean up the exterior and paint it black before I'm finished with the tank.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

While I had the car in the air I also routed the main positive battery cable from the stock Mini battery box in the boot up to the engine bay. This cable is another item I wanted to be sure to protect. I purchased a steel cable guide made for these cars, affixed it in a few spots and ran the battery cable inside. Simple.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40
Mini Rebuild Step 40

The battery cable guide.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

In my last installment the throttle mechanism was about finished except for a custom linkage housing. Here is the design I came up. It utilizes inexpensive bearing and the linkage arms that came with the Joe's Racing throttle pedal.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

I returned to TechShop with a solid block of aluminum and got to work.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

After just a few hours I wound up with this.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Test-fitting proved it will work, although some fine-tuning will be required.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Now pushing (down on the throttle pedal) pulls (the throttle cable).

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Like almost every piece of the car, a reinforcement plate was missing from my Mini when I purchased it. To provide enough support for the rear engine mount, I needed to add a plate. I decided to fabricate one and also cover the holes where someone did a poor job of sealing the RH-drive brake master cylinder holes.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Here's the posterboard template. More soon...

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

I purchased an Aston flip-up fuel lid, requiring the installation of this threaded retaining ring. This required a bit of light sanding and a heavy hammer.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

 

I've spoken before of the ProShift system. Its main component is a large solenoid that activates the sequential gear changer at the touch of the paddle shifter. Of course it needed to be installed in a very specific orientation to the shift rod and swing through an exact arc length. Given the tight confines of my engine bay this left me with exactly one place to mount it and the need to fabricate a new actuator arm. This proved tedious and a bit time-consuming but it is now done. The bonus feature of mounting it in this location meant it interferes with the engine's airbox. A project down the road will be slicing up and re-forming one corner of the airbox to 'wrap around' the solenoid.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Fabricating the solenoid mount.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

 

Mini Rebuild Step 40

Here it is bolted up. I'll have to clean up the bracket when time allows.

 

Continue to Rebuild Step 41

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