Cars


Mini Rebuild

 

Step 39 - The MINIeXvo kit arrives

 

I know it's been a while since I've posted an update. I was waiting for the R1 engine conversion kit to arrive and since I'd tackled most of what I could get done without the kit, I took a break and focused on other things. Now that the kit is here I'm back at it. There's lots to be done.

 

The MINIeXvo kit consists of a steel frame, a transfer box, a reverse mechanism, and miscellaneous sub-assemblies. The frame holds the R1 engine and transfer box. It then bolts into the stock Mini front subframe using the same locations as an original A-series motor. So stock motor mounts are used below while a very short dogbone link is used up top. The transfer box takes power off of the R1's transmission countershaft and sends it through a set of gears down to the differential. In my case I spec'd a Quaife LSD to give me all the help I can get dealing with 150+hp through the front wheels. Not only does the transfer box incorporate cush drive but unlike most other BEC (bike-engined car) kits, there's no chain! That means no need for constant oiling, no chain cleaning, no oil flung around the engine bay, and no need to deal with chain stretch.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

The R1 motor fit perfectly into the frame. I then slid the power transfer box into place and used an engine hoist to drop the whole assembly into the engine bay and onto the stock subframe. It is a tight fit but with a Mini-sized engine bay, anything would be.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

Here's a detail shot of the reversing mechanism.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

Here is the car out on the driveway getting the exhaust system fitted.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

And here is fuel tank number 4!!!! The tank that came with the car was the smaller 7-gallon tank. Too small. I found a very inexpensive used 9 gallon tank for sale so goodbye tank #1. After sanding, painting, and coating the inside of tank #2 with rust-preventative goop and then spending a few bucks having TCDesign modify it to accomodate the rollcage's intrusion into the boot, I was told that using a tank out of a late-model fuel-injected Mini would be a bolt-in deal. No need for the seperate external fuel pump and filters I had been shopping for to make this tank work. Hooray! Goodbye tank #2. After getting confirmation that a shop in England had exactly the tank I needed, I paid way too much to buy it and have it shipped here. The very next day a 7 Enterprises sales flyer arrived with a used FI tank on clearance. Besides a great price it already had the fuel pump installed as well as the sound deadening material and a new fuel level sender. I jumped on it and immediately cancelled my order for the 3rd tank. Goodbye tank #3. Too late though. It was already on its way. But it is just as well that I bought the 4th tank because when tank #3 arrived it was the wrong one! Can you understand why I won't be opening a (profitable) restoration shop anytime soon?

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

So here is tank #4. It has the necessary rollcage cutout...

Mini Rebuild Step 39

...as well as a baffle! Tony installed a tall strip of metal into the bottom of the tank with some small holes drilled through its base. This plate forms a chamber around the fuel pump pick-up so that during extended g-forces the fuel won't be able to slosh away, starving the engine of fuel. Simple and effective. It should allow me to go without a seperate swirl pot.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

And here's where I'm at currently - fitting the throttle mechanism. I love the throttle pedal I purchased a while back but it is a push-type whereas the R1 motor is a pull-type. A week or two of fiddling with custom brackets and linkages and I should have that sorted.

Mini Rebuild Step 39

The R1's throttle bodies on the bench.

 

Mini Rebuild Step 39

Test fitting a custom throttle cable bracket design.

 

Continue to Rebuild Step 40

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